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Poëzie

19 december 2019

Collected Poems

By Curuppumullage Jinarājadāsa (1875–1953).

122 Pages | Published in 1953 | Softcover | Theosophical Publishing House, Adyar | No ISBN.

This Volume of Poems by Jinarājadāsa is presented in fulfilment of a verbal promise made to him in 1949, further enjoined by a clause in his last Will, to the effect that after his death there should be published certain poems written in notebooks carefully preserved by him from 1909, when he first adopted the poetic method for giving expression to his feelings, thoughts and aspirations. Not many of these have previously appeared in print, although from time to time he has quoted a number to illustrate some point in a lecture or a book, and has on several occasions given readings from his poems to Theosophical audiences.

The poems in this collection have been grouped, where possible, according to classifications suggested by Mr. Jinarājadāsa himself. As for the others, they have been arranged under classifications into which they seem quite naturally to fall by reason of their subject matter. The author has always disclaimed any real poetic ability frankly admitting, ‘I am not a poet – yet.’

From page 5:

PEARL OF GREAT PRICE

” A Pearl of great price,
Lo, I have found it;
Heart on the Cross,
Yea, I have bound it.

Mine now the wide world’s
Sorrow and sadness,
Indivisible ever
From my life’s gladness.

Mine now the reaping
Of all men’s sowing,
Deep tribulations
Of age-long growing.

Rests on my shoulder
The world’s sad burden;
Of all men’s sorrows,
Sorrowless warden.

I the alchemist,
With the one solvent,
Woe to joy chanting
Yea, the At-onement.

Till at the reckoning
My Pearl and I render,
YOU discovering
With the surrender. “

England, 1913.

auteur: Jinarajadasa, C.
ISBN:
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Prijs: € 2,50

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Collected Poems

By Curuppumullage Jinarājadāsa (1875–1953).

122 Pages | Published in 1953 | Hardcover | Theosophical Publishing House, Adyar | No ISBN.

Selected and arranged by E.N.

This Volume of Poems by Jinarājadāsa is presented in fulfilment of a verbal promise made to him in 1949, further enjoined by a clause is his last Will, to the effect that after his death there should be published certain poems written in notebooks carefully preserved by him from 1909, when he first adopted the poetic method for giving expression to his feelings, thoughts and aspirations. Not many of these have previously appeared in print, although from time to time he has quoted a number to illustrate some point in a lecture or a book, and has on several occasions given readings from this poems to Theosophical audiences. I am indebted to the Manager of the Theosophical Publishing House, Adyar Madras, for permission to reproduce here a few poems which have already appeared in one or two of the author’s prose works.

From Page 3:

LACRIMAE RERUM
(To ‘Little Flower’)

” This I see – that Nature is but a glass

Before which Form and Formless transient pass.

This I think – that a Hand unseen but kind,

To joys of Life my tranced eyes unbind.

This I feel – that life is a darkened room,

Where yearning I fulfil a weary doom.

This I know – that in inmost heart I cry

From life’s oppressive shadow-show to fly.

For this I AM: my flower-heart unfurled,

Turns to a Sun not of this shadow-world.

And so I cull the perfume of each thing,

And to you, dearest Shadow, tearful bring. “

France, 1913.

auteur: Jinarajadasa, C.
ISBN:
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Prijs: € 5,00

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The Divine Vagabond

By Harindranath Chattophadyaya (1898 – 1990) with a Foreword by Curuppumullage Jinarājadāsa (1875–1953).

Chattopadyaya 135 Pages | Published on Sept. 2nd 1950 | Softcover | Theosophical Publishing House, Adyar | No ISBN.

From the Foreword:

For over half a century the poetry of England and the United States has been balefully influenced by the prevailing materialism of our age. They remind me of our Indian ants, who bite the yellow rind only and never penetrate into the sweet pulp. The Poetry of today with its rhythms and imageries appeals mainly to the mind. Not that they are not exquisite in their way; they can certainly do give delight. Yet nevertheless, it can be said of these poets:

‘Tis ye, ‘tis your estrang-ed faces,

That miss the many-splendoured thing’.

Of course here and there are a few exceptions like Alice Meynell, Francis Thompson, A.E. Yeats, Cousins and a few others. But in the main, I who love poetry greatly, have felt a profound dissatisfaction with the poems I have read.

From the Prelude:

” I AM a vagabond, but never ask me
From where I came.
I only know that I came like a shadow,
I’ll pass like a flame.
Every man that you meet on the roadway
And in the street,
Without his knowing hides a great vagabond’s
Tune in his feet.
What is the sun but a vagabond’s laughter?
What are the stars but a vagabond’s tears?
And the wide world is a wandering vagabond
Looking for some one through the long years. “

 

auteur: Chattopadhyaya, H.
ISBN:
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Prijs: € 2,00

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